April 30, 2015

FONT

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PARINAM

Parinam tarij std-1-8 download click here.


ms excel ma banavel parinam Ni tarij size Only 42 KB.
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April 29, 2015

AHEVAL

Aheval download click here
1-5-15 to 15-5-15 no svachchhata no short ms word ma aheval download karo.
special thanks Mehulbhai Patel sir.

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GUNOTSAV

Gunotsav 4 school certificate watch & pdf download click here




Gunotsav 5 nu result tunk samay ma mukashe. Please Watch & wait.
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April 28, 2015

CCC THEORY VIDEO

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WELL OF DEATH

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Stuntmen perform on their motorbikes and car on the walls of the "Well of Death" at Hyderabad.video:Suman Reddy D


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9 men 5 motorcycle + 4 car in one Maut Ka Kuan - Well of Death"
Car and Motorcycle stunts in a well at Hyderabad Numaish
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DANCE VIDEO

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incredible dance at the talent show 1
super dance 💃 video.
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HISTORY PLACES

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Archaeological sites in Gujarat history places
. Gujarat puratatviy sthalo no video.
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LOTHAL


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Lothal city is one of the well known cities of the ancient Indus valley civilization. The origin and history of Lothal can be dated back to 2400 BC. Lothal in Gujarat is one of the primary sites of archaeology. Though, it was discovered in the year 1954, but its excavation work began on the February 13, 1955, which continued till May 19, 1960. It was done by the Archaeological Survey of India (ASI). Lothal is very well connected to the Ahmedabad city via road and railways. The archaeological excavations that were carried out led to the finding of a township, dock, mound and a marketplace. Areas lying nearby the excavated sites consist of an archaeological museum, where you can take a look at the various Indus-era antiquities. So, if you have spare time, Lothal is a great destination that can be included in your sightseeing trip of Ahmedabad.

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PASSPORT NOC MATE UPAYOGI EXCEL FILE.

PASSPORT NOC MEHSANA DISTRICT
ms excel file total 17 sheets.


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Second link.
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DHOLAVIRA

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A film on Dholavira, Gujarat which bags the Best National Film Award for Creative Contributions in Marketing Tourism Products.





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April 27, 2015

click here to see result


Jee main 2015 result declare..





The Central Board of Secondary Education (CBSE) on Monday announced the result for Joint Entrance Examination (JEE) Main.
 According to media reports, the cutoff score for eligibility for JEE (Advance) is 105 for the general category students. Last year the cut off for the general category was 115.
 The top 1.5 lakh candidates will be eligible to appear for the JEE (Advanced) for admissions to IITs.

You will need to login with important details, like roll number and date of birth, to check the JEE Main Exam results through this link.
 Over 13 lakh students had appeared for the Joint Entrance Exam (Main) 2015.
 Those who will clear in the first two stage of Monday's result will be eligible to register for the JEE (Advanced) 2015, for which the applications will be accepted from May 2 to May 7.
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April 14, 2015

Today is Dr.babasaheb Ambedkar's Jayanti
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Dr.Bhimrao Ambedkar

Dr.Bhimrao Ramji Ambedkar ( 14 April 1891 – 6 December 1956), popularly known as Babasaheb, was an Indian jurist, economist, politician and social reformer who inspired the Modern Buddhist Movement and campaigned against social discrimination of Dalits, women and labour. He was Independent India's first law minister and the principal architect of the Constitution of India.
Ambedkar was a prolific student, earning a law degree and various doctorates from Columbia University and the London School of Economics, and gained a reputation as a scholar for his research in law, economics and political science. In his early career he was an economist, professor, and lawyer. His later life was marked by his political activities, where he became involved in the negotiations for India's independence campaigning by publishing journals advocating political rights and social freedom for 'untouchables' and contributing significantly to the establishment of the state of India. In 1956 he converted to Buddhism, initiating m  ass conversions of Dalits.
In 1990, Ambedkar was posthumously conferred with the Bharat Ratna, India's highest civilian award.Ambedkar's legacy includes numerous memorials and depictions in popular culture.
Dr.Ambedkar Life Story Video



Drafting India's Constitution
                    Upon India's Transfer of Power by British Government to leaders of High Cast on 15 August 1947, the new Congress-led government invited Ambedkar to serve as the nation's first Law Minister, which he accepted. On 29 August, he was appointed Chairman of the Constitution Drafting Committee, charged by the Assembly to write India's new Constitution.[47]
Granville Austin has described the Indian Constitution drafted by Ambedkar as 'first and foremost a social document'. ... 'The majority of India's constitutional provisions are either directly arrived at furthering the aim of social revolution or attempt to foster this revolution by establishing conditions necessary for its achievement.'[48]
The text prepared by Ambedkar provided constitutional guarantees and protections for a wide range of civil liberties for individual citizens, including freedom of religion, the abolition of untouchability and the outlawing of all forms of discrimination. Ambedkar argued for extensive economic and social rights for women, and also won the Assembly's support for introducing a system of reservations of jobs in the civil services, schools and colleges for members of scheduled castes and scheduled tribes and Other Backward Class, a system akin to affirmative action.[49] India's lawmakers hoped to eradicate the socio-economic inequalities and lack of opportunities for India's depressed classes through these measures.The Constitution was adopted on 26 November 1949 by the Constituent Assembly.
Ambedkar resigned from the cabinet in 1951 following the stalling in parliament of his draft of the Hindu Code Bill, which sought to expound gender equality in the laws of inheritance and marriage.[52] Ambedkar independently contested an election in 1952 to the lower house of parliament, the Lok Sabha, but was defeated in the Bombay (North Central) constituency by a little-known Narayan Sadoba Kajrolkar, who polled 138137 votes compared to Ambedkar's 123576 votes.He was appointed to the upper house, of parliament, the Rajya Sabha in March 1952 and would remain as member till death
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Mahatma Gandhi

Mohandas Karamchand Gandhi 
( 2 October 1869 – 30 January 1948) was the preeminent leader of Indian independence movement in British-ruled India. Employing nonviolent civil disobedience, Gandhi led India to independence and inspired movements for civil rights and freedom across the world. The honorific Mahatma (Sanskrit: "high-souled", "venerable"[3])—applied to him first in 1914 in South Africa,[4]—is now used worldwide. He is also called Bapu (Gujarati: endearment for "father",[5] "papa") in India.

Born and raised in a Hindu merchant caste family in coastal Gujarat, western India, and trained in law at the Inner Temple, London, Gandhi first employed nonviolent civil disobedience as an expatriate lawyer in South Africa, in the resident Indian community's struggle for civil rights. After his return to India in 1915, he set about organising peasants, farmers, and urban labourers to protest against excessive land-tax and discrimination. Assuming leadership of the Indian National Congress in 1921, Gandhi led nationwide campaigns for easing poverty, expanding women's rights, building religious and ethnic amity, ending untouchability, but above all for achieving Swaraj or self-rule.

Gandhi famously led Indians in challenging the British-imposed salt tax with the 400 km (250 mi) Dandi Salt March in 1930, and later in calling for the British to Quit India in 1942. He was imprisoned for many years, upon many occasions, in both South Africa and India. Gandhi attempted to practise nonviolence and truth in all situations, and advocated that others do the same. He lived modestly in a self-sufficient residential community and wore the traditional Indian dhoti and shawl, woven with yarn hand spun on a charkha. He ate simple vegetarian food, and also undertook long fasts as a means to both self-purification and social protest.

Gandhi's vision of a free India based on religious pluralism, however, was challenged in the early 1940s by a new Muslim nationalism which was demanding a separate Muslim homeland carved out of India.[7] Eventually, in August 1947, Britain granted independence, but the British Indian Empire[7] was partitioned into two dominions, a Hindu-majority India and Muslim Pakistan.[8] As many displaced Hindus, Muslims, and Sikhs made their way to their new lands, religious violence broke out, especially in the Punjab and Bengal. Eschewing the official celebration of independence in Delhi, Gandhi visited the affected areas, attempting to provide solace. In the months following, he undertook several fasts unto death to promote religious harmony. The last of these, undertaken on 12 January 1948 at age 78,[9] also had the indirect goal of pressuring India to pay out some cash assets owed to Pakistan.[9] Some Indians thought Gandhi was too accommodating.[9][10] Nathuram Godse, a Hindu nationalist, assassinated Gandhi on 30 January 1948 by firing three bullets into his chest at point-blank range.[10]

Indians widely describe Gandhi as the father of the nation.[11][12] His birthday, 2 October, is commemorated as Gandhi Jayanti, a national holiday, and world-wide as the International Day of Nonviolence.

Early life and background


Mohandas Karamchand Gandhi in his earliest known photo, aged 7, c. 1876
Mohandas Karamchand Gandhi[13] was born on 2 October 1869[1] to a Hindu Modh Baniya family[14] in Porbandar (also known as Sudamapuri), a coastal town on the Kathiawar Peninsula and then part of the small princely state of Porbandar in the Kathiawar Agency of the Indian Empire. His father, Karamchand Uttamchand Gandhi (1822–1885), served as the diwan (chief minister) of Porbandar state.
The Gandhi family originated from the village of Kutiana in what was then Junagadh State.[15] In the late 17th or early 18th century, one Lalji Gandhi moved to Porbandar and entered the service of its ruler, the Rana. Successive generations of the family served as civil servants in the state administration before Uttamchand, Mohandas's grandfather, became diwan in the early 19th century under the then Rana of Porbandar, Khimojiraji.[16][17] In 1831, Rana Khimojiraji died suddenly and was succeeded by his 12-year-old only son, Vikmatji.[18] As a result, Rana Khimojirajji's widow, Rani Rupaliba, became Regent for her son. She soon fell out with Uttamchand and forced him to return to his ancestral village in Junagadh. While in Junagadh, Uttamchand appeared before its Nawab and saluted him with his left hand instead of his right, replying that his right hand was pledged to Porbandar's service.[19] In 1841, Vikmatji assumed the throne and reinstated Uttamchand as his diwan.

Civil rights activist in South Africa (1893–1914)

Gandhi in South Africa (1895)
Gandhi was 24 when he arrived in South Africa[58] to work as a legal representative for the Muslim Indian Traders based in the city of Pretoria.[59] He spent 21 years in South Africa, where he developed his political views, ethics and political leadership skills.[citation needed]
Indians in South Africa were led by wealthy Muslims, who employed Gandhi as a lawyer, and by impoverished Hindu indentured labourers with very limited rights. Gandhi considered them all to be Indians, taking a lifetime view that "Indianness" transcended religion and caste. He believed he could bridge historic differences, especially regarding religion, and he took that belief back to India where he tried to implement it. The South African experience exposed handicaps to Gandhi that he had not known about. He realised he was out of contact with the enormous complexities of religious and cultural life in India, and believed he understood India by getting to know and leading Indians in South Africa.[60]

Truth and Satyagraha


"God is truth. The way to truth lies through ahimsa (nonviolence)"—Sabarmati 13 March 1927

Gandhi dedicated his life to the wider purpose of discovering truth, or Satya. He tried to achieve this by learning from his own mistakes and conducting experiments on himself. He called his autobiography The Story of My Experiments with Truth.[178]

Bruce Watson argues that Gandhi based Satyagraha on the Vedantic ideal of self-realization, and notes it also contains Jain and Buddhist notions of nonviolence, vegetarianism, the avoidance of killing, and 'agape' (universal love). Gandhi also borrowed Christian-Islamic ideas of equality, the brotherhood of man, and the concept of turning the other cheek.[179]

Gandhi stated that the most important battle to fight was overcoming his own demons, fears, and insecurities. Gandhi summarised his beliefs first when he said "God is Truth". He would later change this statement to "Truth is God". Thus, satya (truth) in Gandhi's philosophy is "God".[180]

The essence of Satyagraha (a name Gandhi invented meaning "adherence to truth"[181]) is that it seeks to eliminate antagonisms without harming the antagonists themselves and seeks to transform or "purify" it to a higher level. A euphemism sometimes used for Satyagraha is that it is a "silent force" or a "soul force" (a term also used by Martin Luther King Jr. during his famous "I Have a Dream" speech). It arms the individual with moral power rather than physical power. Satyagraha is also termed a "universal force", as it essentially "makes no distinction between kinsmen and strangers, young and old, man and woman, friend and foe."[182]

Gandhi wrote: "There must be no impatience, no barbarity, no insolence, no undue pressure. If we want to cultivate a true spirit of democracy, we cannot afford to be intolerant. Intolerance betrays want of faith in one's cause."[183] Civil disobedience and nonco-operation as practised under Satyagraha are based on the "law of suffering",[184] a doctrine that the endurance of suffering is a means to an end. This end usually implies a moral upliftment or progress of an individual or society. Therefore, nonco-operation in Satyagraha is in fact a means to secure the co-operation of the opponent consistently with truth and justice.[185]








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